The Laws of War and Modern Empathy

The Laws of War and Modern Empathy I can’t speak on behalf of all development and humanitarian aid workers, but I am certain that my thoughts echo those of many – the innumerable images of families, of children, of people staring at nothing, broken and hopeless have become, over time, images that we feel compelled …

Continue reading ‘The Laws of War and Modern Empathy’ »

The 10 Year Cycle: Peace Agreements and Conflict Resolution

Denika Blacklock Karim It is quite tiresome to read commentaries that discuss ‘conflict resolution’ in the context of the content of a peace agreement. Although not an expert in the field of conflict resolution, I have fairly good knowledge of what ‘resolving’ a conflict entails, and I’m sure I’m not the only person who wants …

Continue reading ‘The 10 Year Cycle: Peace Agreements and Conflict Resolution’ »

It’s Not OK to Copy and Paste… Especially When it Comes to Conflict Management

This week’s cross-post comes to us from Graz University, ‘Bosnia is No Model for Ukrainian Peace’ (http://www.suedosteuropa.uni-graz.at/biepag/node/106), an article which discusses the publicly ‘successful’ conflict resolution model emanating from Bosnia in 1995, and the problem of replicating the model and process in other conflict situations today, notably in Ukraine. As the authors note, the key …

Continue reading ‘It’s Not OK to Copy and Paste… Especially When it Comes to Conflict Management’ »

Lessons for Understanding Conflict and Conflict Management

This week’s cross-post is an interesting interview with Professor Mahmood Mamdani (Uganda) of the Makerere Institute of Social Research. He sits down with ENCA’s ‘Breaking Views with UNICEF’ to discuss the African experience in conflict management. Why do civil wars happen? “Unsettled questions” such as who belongs to the nation? and what is the definition …

Continue reading ‘Lessons for Understanding Conflict and Conflict Management’ »

‘Lasting peace between warring parties will be achieved only when stalemate occurs, not when checkmate happens’ – An interview with Irwandi Yusuf

The third in our series of practitioner interviews was with the popular Irwandi Yusuf, a former senior representative of the Free Aceh Movement (GAM) during the conflict in Aceh, Indonesia, which was settled in 2005, and later became the first elected Governor of the province of Aceh in 2007. A pragmatist through and through, he …

Continue reading ‘‘Lasting peace between warring parties will be achieved only when stalemate occurs, not when checkmate happens’ – An interview with Irwandi Yusuf’ »

Finding Connections between Traditional Governance and Formal Law in Samoa

Nanai Sovala Agaiava Introduction: Background and Challenges In Samoa, several attempts have been made over the years to integrate the two systems of government. The diversity of traditional practices exercised by each village remain a challenge to any strategy or policy focusing on marrying the two systems. The Constitution of Samoa 1960 remains the sole …

Continue reading ‘Finding Connections between Traditional Governance and Formal Law in Samoa’ »

The Catch-22 of Post-Conflict Aid

Cameron Noble By definition, post-conflict aid aims to prevent further conflict and build peace in regions wracked by violence. However, if post-conflict aid is not managed properly, with sensitivity to conflict drivers, it can rekindle old conflicts and create new ones. This essay examines the issue based on the experience of post-conflict aid in Aceh …

Continue reading ‘The Catch-22 of Post-Conflict Aid’ »

“Peace agreements, of course, have the central weakness that they accept the logic of those waging the wars” – An Interview with Florian Bieber

The second in our series of practitioner interviews was with the very in-demand Florian Bieber, a specialist in inter-ethnic relations, ethnic conflict and nationalism, focusing on Southeastern Europe. His work includes expert advice on minorities and minority rights for the European Commission, the OSCE, and the Council of Europe as well as providing advice to …

Continue reading ‘“Peace agreements, of course, have the central weakness that they accept the logic of those waging the wars” – An Interview with Florian Bieber’ »

The Peace Building Framework in Aceh: It Worked Just Enough, Here’s Why

Cameron Noble Introduction This paper introduces the key legal frameworks to manage the Aceh peace building process[1] in the initial period of August 2005 to early-2009. It examines what worked well and what didn’t, including exploring fault lines in the frameworks that caused tensions to emerge, and aims to provide some insights on peace building …

Continue reading ‘The Peace Building Framework in Aceh: It Worked Just Enough, Here’s Why’ »